Transitional Justice

Seeking recognition of people's right to truth, accountability, reconciliation and reparations

Transitional Justice

LFJL’s Transitional Justice Programme seeks to carry out activities that ensure that victims of human rights abuses realise their right to know the truth, see those responsible held to account, and receive adequate reparations. It is based on the understanding that without these rights of victims to truth, accountability and redress being achieved, peaceful coexistence between communities in Libya will be unable to take root.

 The Transitional Justice Programme works with actors in Libya to document a broad range of human rights violations, including human rights abuses that took place during the 2011 uprising and the ongoing human rights violations against migrants. The programme ensures that these documents are stored securely so that they may be used as evidence in future truth, reconciliation and accountability efforts. The programme also seeks to create space for discussions and debates not currently being had regarding transitional justice issues such as those related to the right to reconciliation of communities perceived as being ‘against’ the uprising who are currently severely marginalised.

We also advocate for the implementation of laws and policies that support a transitional justice mechanism that is objective, nonpolitical and inclusive of all groups and communities in Libya.

The Transitional Justice Programme seeks to support the implementation of transitional justice legislation and state mechanisms that adhere to the rule of law and fair trial standards. It provides support and capacity building opportunities to legal practitioners, so that they may benefit from international experiences of transitional justice. To assist those who have documented or are actively documenting human rights violations, the programme provides training on admissibility standards; seeks to establish new collaborative information sharing relationships between individuals and organisations; and facilitates the secure storage of information to ensure that activists and their work are protected. It also creates spaces for dialogue between stakeholders including human rights violation survivors and marginalised communities and works to engage them in discussions regarding transitional justice issues.

Human Rights Archive Project

In 2017, we launched the Human Rights Archive (the Archive), a digital archive of evidence related to human rights violations in Libya. We established the Archive with the founding group of Libyan NGOs, ‘The Network for Monitoring and Archiving for Justice’ (SHIRA), which we brought together in 2016. The project seeks to protect documentation and evidence of human rights violations in Libya, which is at risk of being lost, stolen or damaged. LFJL created a centralised space where organisations can share information relating to human rights abuses in order to create a national archive of human rights violations to support future transitional justice processes.

International criminal court (ICC) Moot Court Competition

In 2018, we hosted the first International Criminal Moot Court Competition at the University of Libya, taking the law out of the books and into the courtroom. Through in-depth training, the project provides students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge of international humanitarian law and international criminal law and to enhance their legal drafting and presentation skills. The competition culminates in a final event where the best two teams for the Defence and for the Office of the Prosecutor present their arguments before an expert panel of judges. The final event is open to the public, creating new spaces for discussion on human rights, justice and law.

Latest News

Weekly Briefing

September 21, 2018
“Artists become advocates and audiences become activists.” In his incredible show at Screen on the Green on 20 September, the wonderful George the Poet told the story of #RoutesToJustice eloquently and powerfully; the show will feature as an episode of Have You Heard George's Podcast very soon, and we cannot wait to share it!

Weekly Briefing

August 23, 2018
Around 2,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) were forcibly evicted from Tariq al-Matar Camp on 10 August 2018. The camp in Tripoli, home to over 370 displaced Tawerghan families, was reportedly attacked by members of a militia brigade. The militia looted the camp, kidnapped 78 IDPs, and demanded the camp’s evacuation while threatening demolition with bulldozers. These acts violate fundamental rights recognised by the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights to which Libya is a party, including the right to freedom of movement, self-determination and from unlawful interference with one’s privacy, family or home. Furthermore, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, which has jurisdiction over crimes committed in Libya, identifies the deportation or forced transfer of a population as a crime against humanity.

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